Woodworking DIY

Which Nail Gun Do I Need to Buy?

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Which gauge? Battery? There are so many choices to choosing a nail gun!

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Article: http://ycmt2.com/blog/WhichNailGunToBuy

Kind of surface nailers readily available.

There are four main determines (nail sizes, each weapon just shoots one size) readily available. 15, 16, 18, and 23.

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15 and 16 gauge are best matched for trim work. 15 gauge guns are somewhat bigger however have an angled magazine and the nails are glued at an angle, this makes getting into corners much easier.

Pneumatic vs. Battery.

The tiniest readily available is the 23 gauge, or pin nailer. Pin nails are tiny and headless! This makes them best for fragile work, they’re so small they often do not even require to have the holes puttied over due to the fact that they simply vanish.

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The 18 gauge nailers are called brad nails, don’t ask me why – however inform me if you understand! They’re smaller than the trim nailers (nails get smaller as the gauge goes up). The size range available is 5/8″ to 2″. That’s why you see the brad nailer in many wood stores. It has a head so there’s some holding power, but the lengths readily available make it very flexible for all kinds of furnishings or woodworking pieces. In building, it’s used for setting up smaller sized trim pieces like stops, shoe, and quarter round.

The downsides are they tend to be much heavier, larger, slower, and louder (ruling out the compressor) than pneumatics.

Battery tech has actually made leaps and bounds in the past several years and nailers have actually been swept up too. The upsides to battery nailers are they do not need a compressor, they work anywhere in the world you have actually a charged battery, and there’s no hose pipe hooked to it to get captured up on things and drag around.

Pneumatics are essentially the exact opposite of battery. They’re much faster, lighter, and quieter. However … they needed a compressor or tank of air and are connected to that hose pipe.

15 and 16 gauge are best suited for trim work. 15 gauge weapons are a little larger but have an angled magazine and the nails are glued at an angle, this makes getting into corners easier. The 18 gauge nailers are called brad nails, don’t ask me why – but tell me if you know! They’re smaller than the trim nailers (nails get smaller as the gauge goes up). The smallest offered is the 23 gauge, or pin nailer.

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